Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Formal education in education

From: Bruce Smith <cultural.renewal_at_gmail.com>
Date: Thu Jun 15 16:12:00 2006

a postscript: anything that develops one's people skills and one's ability
to multitask and interact with the public/the authorities could help prepare
one for work as a staff member. yet i'm inclined to say that running one's
own business is far better preparation than studying to become a teacher.

-- bruce

On 6/15/06, Bruce Smith <cultural.renewal_at_gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Mike,
>
> I received a Master's in Education in 1991. Aside from student teaching
> and one class (in 2.5 years), it didn't even prepare me one iota to teach
> in _conventional_ schools: it was purely a credential, and largely a waste
> of my time. Was it a drawback to Sudbury staffing? Not necessarily, though
> it did give me more to unlearn.
>
> Now, the actual _experience_ of teaching, as opposed to teacher education,
> did help somewhat; certainly my years as a tutor proved useful. A Sudbury
> staff member must respect and relate to people, and convey information and
> ideas in an effective manner. But one hardly needs formal education as a
> teacher to learn this, and indeed, that path is just as likely in my view to
> warp one's understanding of children and the ways in which they learn.
>
> Bruce Smith, staff
> Alpine Valley School
>
>
> --
> "I was at this restaurant. The sign said 'Breakfast Anytime.' So I ordered
> French Toast in the Renaissance."
>
> Steven Wright
>

-- 
"I was at this restaurant. The sign said 'Breakfast Anytime.' So I ordered
French Toast in the Renaissance."
Steven Wright
Received on Thu Jun 15 2006 - 16:11:03 EDT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0 : Mon Jun 04 2007 - 00:03:14 EDT