RE: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Encouragment.

From: Alan Klein <alan_at_klein.net>
Date: Tue Apr 5 00:29:00 2005

Sure it is.at least in traditional education! "Kelly, I encourage you to
take more AP courses." Meanwhile, the principal is being feted by the local
newspaper and is lauded by the local educational establishment for the
number of AP courses his students take. Given the power differential that
exists and the peer and community pressure that exists and the pressure from
college admissions officers that exists, there is a pretty fine line between
that "encouragement" and a "should". (The above is a fairly accurate
portrayal of my younger daughter's public high school.)

 

Now in the normal use of the term, encouragement can be a good thing. I love
being encouraged to do what I want to do. I love being encouraged by those I
trust that I can do more than I think I can in the moment. On the other
hand, it can also be a bad thing. I hate being encouraged to do something
I'd really rather not do. I hate being encouraged by people I don't trust to
push myself farther than I think I can go.

 

~Alan Klein

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Todd Pratum
That is not clear to me! The word encouragement is not related to the word
should. Todd.

Alan Klein wrote:

Scott was pretty clear, I think, that when he put the word in quotes, he
meant something more akin to
"encouragement-because-I-think-I-know-better-for-you-than-you-do-for-yoursel
f." This is not what I mean by the use of the term without quotes, so I
guess we have been talking past one another in part on this.

 

"Encouragement" is not a skill that is looked for in a staff member in a
democratic school. Encouragement is, in my opinion.
 
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Received on Tue Apr 05 2005 - 00:28:06 EDT

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