[Discuss-sudbury-model] Re: replies to where to begin

From: susan robinson <shantiom1_at_msn.com>
Date: Mon Nov 29 13:20:00 2004

Hi all!
First, let me thank everyone who responded to our math plea. We are so grateful for your generous sharing of thoughts, experience and suggestions! They confirm our instincts to validate our child and appreciate her as she is. Still in a bit of a quandary over choosing direction for her schooling (have looked at and don't consider the local Palm Harbor Spring Valley school as a viable alternative for us. Every school that claims to follow a Sudbury model is not necessarily Sudbury Valley School). I'll be following up on the reading list and resources that your replies have given us. Shanti, our 8 year old daughter, likes school for its social value...it's a place to visit with friends. (Her main gripe in life is being an only child). This is one of several reasons that home schooling feels wrong for us. I would love any recommendations on "freedom" parenting, as I admit I don't live up to my own standards in that domain. (My parenting seems to me to be a combination of the way I was raised, respect for my child's extraordinary being, and a little training and experience in Applied Behavior Analysis or Positive Parenting Glenn Latham style. My gut tells me that the respect component is the ultimate guide, but it needs form). I actually think that Shanti's social and emotional smarts compensates for much of my parenting deficiencies, but I'd still like to improve. Re: schooling at SVS, reading Free At Last, my mind sticks on the Hazards chapter and I find myself fearful of young children, like our 8 year old, being unsupervised. I'm willing to own those fears as my own projections, but I struggle with them as a parent. After all, there are real dangers in the world. Thanks in advance for any thoughts you may want to share.
Susan
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: discuss-sudbury-model-request_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model-request_at_sudval.org>
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Sent: Monday, November 29, 2004 11:44 AM
  Subject: Discuss-sudbury-model digest, Vol 1 #212 - 7 msgs

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  Today's Topics:

     1. Re: On mathematics... (Carol Hughes)
     2. Re: On mathematics... (Ryan Singer)
     3. Re: On mathematics... (Naomi Bennett)
     4. Re: On mathematics... (Ryan Singer)
     5. Re: Where to begin? (Jonell Alvi)
     6. Re: Discuss-sudbury-model digest, Vol 1 #209 - 8 msgs (Evan k Hughes)
     7. Re: Where to begin? (Caren Knox-Hundley)

  --__--__--

  Message: 1
  From: "Carol Hughes" <hughes0005_at_comcast.net<mailto:hughes0005_at_comcast.net>>
  To: <discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>>
  Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] On mathematics...
  Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 18:46:48 -0500
  Reply-To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>

  Hi Ryan,
  It's interesting to me that the responses are about adult individual
  experiences with math. What do you think would be a good tack for this
  child? I have an eight year old voice student who is learning the Major
  General song from the Pirates of Penzance. I think he's going to be ready
  for his first year of college by the age of 9, because he wants to know the
  meanings of all the lyrics, which I am teaching him. He has superb voice
  and a brilliant inquisitive mind. Ironically the won't teach him as much
  math as he would like at school. i think it's a dang shame.
    "I am the very model of a modern Major-General,
    I've information vegetable, animal, and mineral,
    I know the kings of England, and I quote the fights historical
    From Marathon to Waterloo, in order categorical;
    I'm very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
    I understand equations, both the simple and quadratical,
    About binomial theorem I'm teeming with a lot o' news,
    With many cheerful facts about the square of the hypotenuse.

                 I'm very good at integral and differential calculus;
    I know the scientific names of beings animalculous:
    In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
    I am the very model of a modern Major-General.

                 I know our mythic history, King Arthur's and Sir Caradoc's;
    I answer hard acrostics, I've a pretty taste for paradox,
    I quote in elegiacs all the crimes of Heliogabalus,
    In conics I can floor peculiarities parabolous;"
  So, I'll shut up now. I just can't stand to see a child's sense of self
  questioned, ever.
  Carol

  ----- Original Message -----
  From: "Ryan Singer" <ryan.singer_at_gmail.com<mailto:ryan.singer_at_gmail.com>>
  To: <discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>>
  Sent: Sunday, November 28, 2004 2:38 PM
  Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] On mathematics...

> On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 11:08:50 -0800, Darren Stanley <rds1_at_ualberta.ca<mailto:rds1_at_ualberta.ca>>
> wrote:
>> At the risk of starting a war, I can't begin to say how troubling it is
>> to
>> hear and read various statements made about mathematics as if "it" is
>> some
>> kind of demon. Just like singing, studying bacteria, re-building car
>> blocks,
>> writing poetry, and so, mathematics is a deeply human ACTIVITY. It can be
>> and is something beautiful that people can and do engage in.
>
> I agree with Darren. I got into college at 16 in GA by taking
> calculus there, and I still have a love for math (despite changing my
> major from math to economics). For people who love pattern
> recognition, higher level mathematics is like ballet. My sister came
> to me with questions about Algebra that her teacher refused to answer
> (because it was too far ahead of the class), and I ended up spending
> the evening teaching her derivatives and integrals. Math is
> incredible fun for those who take an interest in it, just like most
> other traditionally "Academic" subjects.-R
>
> --
> _________________________
> Ryan Singer
> Editor In Chief, The Sentinel
> http://foothillsentinel.com<http://foothillsentinel.com/>
> _______________________________________________
> Discuss-sudbury-model mailing list
> Discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:Discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
> http://www.sudval.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/discuss-sudbury-model<http://www.sudval.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/discuss-sudbury-model>
>

  --__--__--

  Message: 2
  Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 15:57:41 -0800
  From: Ryan Singer <ryan.singer_at_gmail.com<mailto:ryan.singer_at_gmail.com>>
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] On mathematics...
  Reply-To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>

  On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 18:46:48 -0500, Carol Hughes <hughes0005_at_comcast.net<mailto:hughes0005_at_comcast.net>> wrote:
> Hi Ryan,
> It's interesting to me that the responses are about adult individual
> experiences with math. What do you think would be a good tack for this
> child? I have an eight year old voice student who is learning the Major
>

  Math is pretty easy to teach if the child wants to learn. I would
  just get a whiteboard and an algebra textbook and start working
  problems from the "homework" section of the book. Work one with the
  child, then feed him another almost exactly like it. If he gets it on
  his own, move on, if he doesn't, help him with that one and then do
  another exactly like it. repeat for each section of the h-w, repeat
  for each chapter. At that rate, I went through the Algebra textbook
  (supposedly a year of schooling) in two days with my sister. After
  that we did trig, and then precalc, and then calculus. Really all you
  need is a large list of pregenerated homework problems and some free
  time. Never assign the problems, work through each kind. I have
  never met a human being unable to do calculus, only ones afraid to.-R

  --
  _________________________
  Ryan Singer
  Editor In Chief, The Sentinel
  http://foothillsentinel.com<http://foothillsentinel.com/>

  --__--__--

  Message: 3
  Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 18:59:30 -0800 (PST)
  From: Naomi Bennett <morninghood_at_yahoo.com<mailto:morninghood_at_yahoo.com>>
  Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] On mathematics...
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Reply-To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>

  I have
> never met a human being unable to do calculus, only
> ones afraid to.-R

  And then there are the ones who are just not
  interested at that point in their lives. I went
  through 13 years of SVS, and I strongly believe that
  children should be encouraged to learn what they are
  interested in, and not forced into learning. That's
  something you learn in college, if you choose to go.
  And that's a whole separate set of skills that can
  completely ruin any sort of learning if it happens at
  too early an age.

  And who is to say that math is any more important that
  writing, art, dance, photography, history, theatre.

  And by the way, I have studied and tutored math in
  college, and have no interest or use for it now except
  in a practical sense. But others could say the same
  for Theatrical studies, which is part of my everyday
  life and livelyhood.

  It's not for us to choose what should be important and
  interesting for others.

  Naomi
  SVS Alum '83-'96

  __________________________________________________
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  Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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  --__--__--

  Message: 4
  Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 19:14:59 -0800
  From: Ryan Singer <ryan.singer_at_gmail.com<mailto:ryan.singer_at_gmail.com>>
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] On mathematics...
  Reply-To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>

  I'm sorry, I think I came off wrong. I would never advocate forcing
  someone to learn something outside of college. My last post was more
  directed to the young child who wants to learn advanced math because
  it's in the song and he wants to understand it. I was saying that
  despite the popular opinion that higher level math is difficult, it is
  actually very possible for anyone, especially kids.-R

  On Sun, 28 Nov 2004 18:59:30 -0800 (PST), Naomi Bennett
  <morninghood_at_yahoo.com<mailto:morninghood_at_yahoo.com>> wrote:
> I have
> > never met a human being unable to do calculus, only
> > ones afraid to.-R
>
> And then there are the ones who are just not
> interested at that point in their lives. I went
> through 13 years of SVS, and I strongly believe that
> children should be encouraged to learn what they are
> interested in, and not forced into learning. That's
> something you learn in college, if you choose to go.
> And that's a whole separate set of skills that can
> completely ruin any sort of learning if it happens at
> too early an age.
>
> And who is to say that math is any more important that
> writing, art, dance, photography, history, theatre.
>
> And by the way, I have studied and tutored math in
> college, and have no interest or use for it now except
> in a practical sense. But others could say the same
> for Theatrical studies, which is part of my everyday
> life and livelyhood.
>
> It's not for us to choose what should be important and
> interesting for others.
>
> Naomi
> SVS Alum '83-'96
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com<http://mail.yahoo.com/>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Discuss-sudbury-model mailing list
> Discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:Discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
> http://www.sudval.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/discuss-sudbury-model<http://www.sudval.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/discuss-sudbury-model>
>

  --
  _________________________
  Ryan Singer
  Editor In Chief, The Sentinel
  http://foothillsentinel.com<http://foothillsentinel.com/>

  --__--__--

  Message: 5
  Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 21:02:19 -0800 (PST)
  From: Jonell Alvi <jnjalvi_at_yahoo.com<mailto:jnjalvi_at_yahoo.com>>
  Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Where to begin?
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Reply-To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>

  --0-1453362340-1101704539=:66842
  Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

  Hi Susan,
   
  I don't know if this is what you are looking for, but you might check out the Right Start Mathematics program (http://www.alabacus.com/<http://www.alabacus.com/>). I'm a homeschooling mom, and this program makes math pretty fun for kids. It's based on a lot of games, and uses a lot of manipulatives to help the kids discover math.
   
  One of the best things about the program (to me) is the RightStart yahoo support group. It is a groupvery supportive of newcomers and questions. The woman who developed the program (Joan Cotter) also participates and answers questions. You can learn more about the program from the Yahoo Group.(http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RightStart/<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RightStart/>)
   
   
  Jonell
   
   
   
   
   
   

  susan robinson <shantiom1_at_msn.com<mailto:shantiom1_at_msn.com>> wrote:
  I am reading Free at Last, which I obtained from Abraham-Hicks Publications. Our daughter is 8 and attends a local Montessori in Palm Harbor, Florida. Our sweet 8 year old is struggling with math, and I am struggling with trying to coerce her into learning it. It's a no win deal. We have her enrolled in Kumon math tutoring, which she attempts to avoid and postpone on a daily basis. Her teacher at Montessori told me that she has a "peculiar learning style". I tried to explain that she loves the freedom to choose, that her "failure to perform" certain class assignments are due to a lack of interest rather than a lack of intelligence. Our daughter sparkles. She loves people and loves art, but loves people best of all. I consider it a rare gift, and I can see how the use of coercion, even in the forms of rewards and incentives, dims her. I'm looking for a frame of reference that builds a foundation for integrating freedom into living in the "real world" of responsibili!
  ties.
   I'd like to receive suggestions. We're not quite ready to move to Massachusetts for our daughter to enroll in SVS (although it is certainly an option to be considered). I also need to understand more about how democracy can work; I've often found myself in the minority opinion and outvoted in many so-called democracies.

  ---------------------------------
  Do you Yahoo!?
   Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard.
  --0-1453362340-1101704539=:66842
  Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

  <DIV>Hi Susan,</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>I don't know if this is what you are looking for, but you might check out the Right Start Mathematics program (http://www.alabacus.com/).&nbsp<http://www.alabacus.com/">http://www.alabacus.com/</A>).&nbsp>; I'm a homeschooling mom, and this program makes math pretty fun for kids.&nbsp; It's based on a lot of games, and uses a lot of manipulatives to help the kids discover math.&nbsp; </DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>One of the&nbsp;best things about the program (to me) is the RightStart yahoo support group.&nbsp; It is a groupvery supportive of newcomers and questions.&nbsp; The woman who developed the program (Joan Cotter) also participates and answers questions.&nbsp; You can learn more about the program from the Yahoo Group.(http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RightStart/)</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>Jonell</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
  <DIV><BR><BR><B><I>susan robinson &lt;shantiom1_at_msn.com&gt;</I></B> wrote:</DIV>
  <BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">
  <STYLE></STYLE>

  <META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.2523" name=GENERATOR><!--[gte IE 5]><?xml:namespace prefix="v" /><?xml:namespace prefix="o" /><![endif]-->
  <DIV>I am reading Free at Last, which I obtained from Abraham-Hicks Publications.&nbsp; Our daughter is 8 and attends a local Montessori in Palm Harbor, Florida.&nbsp; Our sweet 8 year old is struggling with math, and I am struggling with trying to coerce her into learning it.&nbsp; It's a no win deal.&nbsp; We have her enrolled in Kumon math tutoring, which she attempts to avoid and postpone on a daily basis.&nbsp; Her teacher at Montessori told me that she has a "peculiar learning style".&nbsp; I tried to explain that she loves the freedom to choose, that her "failure to perform" certain class assignments are due to a lack of interest rather than a lack of intelligence.&nbsp; Our daughter sparkles.&nbsp; She loves people and loves art, but loves people best of all.&nbsp; I consider it a rare gift, and I&nbsp;can see how the use of coercion, even in the forms of rewards and incentives,&nbsp;dims her.&nbsp;&nbsp;I'm looking&nbsp;for&nbsp;a frame of reference that builds a fo!
  undation
   for integrating freedom into living in the "real world" of responsibilities.&nbsp; I'd&nbsp;like to receive suggestions.&nbsp; We're not quite ready to move to Massachusetts for our daughter to enroll in SVS (although&nbsp;it is certainly an option to be considered).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;I also need to understand more about how democracy can work;&nbsp; I've often found myself in the minority opinion and outvoted in many so-called democracies.&nbsp; </DIV></BLOCKQUOTE><p>
  <hr size=1>Do you Yahoo!?<br>
  Read only the mail you want - YahooYahoo>! Mail SpamGuard.
  --0-1453362340-1101704539=:66842--

  --__--__--

  Message: 6
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 09:42:06 -0600
  From: Evan k Hughes <evanhughes_at_juno.com<mailto:evanhughes_at_juno.com>>
  Subject: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Re: Discuss-sudbury-model digest, Vol 1 #209 - 8 msgs
  Reply-To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>

    Hi Susan,
         I'm an Alumni of SVS and now a doctor. My experiences at SVS and
  then college might be useful to you and your daughter:
       I didn't learn to read until the age of 12. I felt shame before I
  did, and wanted to learn because I thought I should, but my personality
  is such that my heart needs to be in something before I do it. I ended
  up learning by necessity to play role playing games (Table top style.)
  The importance there is that the rules are much to complex to be learned
  orally, and so I needed reading and witting to keep up with my peers.
  [Poof] my heart was in it. Until my mind unlocked I tried lessons with
  people, drills and workbooks to no effect. It was not my time. After my
  time came, I can't honestly remember the method with which I learned. At
  15 I took up spelling in Japanese.
       Adaptation is the key. Human beings learn what they need to make
  their life work, it's that simple. In talking about math, I started
  lesions with Danny Greenberg in Algebra because of curiosity. It was
  interesting for a time, but them my attention was not held by the
  subject. I started being late, missing lessons and not doing work. I
  sat down for a lesson on day and obviously looked stressed out. Danny
  looked at me and said "Evan, you're killing me. I started this school so
  I didn't have to see this. You're killing yourself. Why?" I told him I
  wanted to know trigonometry and touch on calculus (Friends of mine had
  done both and it looked interesting.) The man closed the book we where
  using and said "Ok, we need a specific algebra to use trig, then we can
  start." I sucked up the next few lessons and we started trig. I loved
  it. 10 years later working in management, there where a group of people
  trying to figure out how big our truck needed to be to move equipment.
  College graduates all around, and guess who remembered the theorem of the
  hypotenuse and how to use it. I loved the space oriented math, and so it
  stuck.
       Now, the algebra I didn't learn came back to haunt me as Chemistry
  in a requirement for chiropractic school. All those things I skipped by
  with Danny where now looking at me with chemical symbols in front of
  them. GUESS WHAT, because of my understanding of space oriented math
  (for me attaching numbers to something real,) I was able to learn algebra
  and chemistry together as one subject. Of course it was hard. I didn't
  care. After learning real number application and how equations worked in
  the "real world," physics the following semester was an easy A.
  Adaptation is the key. If there is nothing attached to the numbers I
  can't learn your silly equations. Put meaning in there and I will learn
  Greek if I have to.
       Now, my spelling is only readable because of spell check, my hand
  witting is that of a doctor in the since that only I can read it, and
  other "staples" of education may be missing from my skill set. WHO
  CARES!? When I came across a reason to know something, I learned with
  the same concentration as playing chess and all the fun of climbing the
  beach tree.
       My simple advice is, let your daughter find natural consequences to
  her learning and not learning skills.
       It is not true that you need to "start young." It is a lie that
  cripples our young minds. If you need a skill, go learn it when it's
  time.
       I agree with the list member who said math is not a demon, and it
  does get a bad rap.
       I challenge anyone who tells me however, that we must learn it in a
  set way (Books, lessons, class rooms, teachers) or that it be learned "on
  time."
      Your daughter is 8 years old and can't do math? Can she read? If
  so, she's "ahead" of me...
   
  regards,
   
   
  Dr. Evan Hughes
   
   
   
   
   
    ----- Original Message -----=20
      From: susan robinson=20
      To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org=20<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudvalorg=20>
      Sent: Sunday, November 28, 2004 12:01 PM
      Subject: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Where to begin?
   
   
      I am reading Free at Last, which I obtained from Abraham-Hicks =
  Publications. Our daughter is 8 and attends a local Montessori in Palm =
  Harbor, Florida. Our sweet 8 year old is struggling with math, and I am
  =
  struggling with trying to coerce her into learning it. It's a no win =
  deal. We have her enrolled in Kumon math tutoring, which she attempts =
  to avoid and postpone on a daily basis. Her teacher at Montessori told =
  me that she has a "peculiar learning style". I tried to explain that
  =
  she loves the freedom to choose, that her "failure to perform" certain
  =
  class assignments are due to a lack of interest rather than a lack of =
  intelligence. Our daughter sparkles. She loves people and loves art, =
  but loves people best of all. I consider it a rare gift, and I can see =
  how the use of coercion, even in the forms of rewards and incentives, =
  dims her. I'm looking for a frame of reference that builds a foundation
  =
  for integrating freedom into living in the "real world" of =
  responsibilities. I'd like to receive suggestions. We're not quite =
  ready to move to Massachusetts for our daughter to enroll in SVS =
  (although it is certainly an option to be considered). I also need to =
  understand more about how democracy can work; I've often found myself =
  in the minority opinion and outvoted in many so-called democracies.

  ________________________________________________________________
  Juno Platinum $9.95. Juno SpeedBand $14.95.
  Sign up for Juno Today at http://www.juno.com<http://www.juno.com/>!
  Look for special offers at Best Buy stores.

  --__--__--

  Message: 7
  Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 11:43:44 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
  From: Caren Knox-Hundley <carenkh_at_earthlink.net<mailto:carenkh_at_earthlink.net>>
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Where to begin?
  Reply-To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>

  It seems like it would be inherently impossible to utilize the Sudbury model in any type of "traditional school" setting -- Montessori or not. You can tell your daughter she will learn math when she needs it and wants to, but until then, there will be consequences for her not learning it now, but it seems like those consequences would only undermine her belief in her own ability to learn at her own pace. I don't see how anyone can participate in a school (other than democratic/free) and live the values of Sudbury Valley. They would continually be getting messages (from the school, teacher, and peers) that they were not OK, and they will not be OK until they fit in.

  Take her out! Until you find a democratic school in your area, or one you want to move to, unschool with her! Someone previously mentioned unschooling -- there are many, many resources and lots of support out there. As far as integrating freedom into the "real world" of responsibilities... unless the school itself is a free school, it ain't gonna support that. The model of kids following a set curriculum at a set time is too ingrained. Here in NC, we have end-of-grade tests in 3rd, 6th and 11th grades. If the kids don't pass the test, they don't move on to the next grade -- so everything, everything is now geared toward these tests -- AND annual tests that kids must pass in order to prove the school is doing its job. There is NO WAY they're going to hear anything about the Sudbury Valley model. SO, I pulled my oldest son out to unschool with him after the 2nd grade four years ago, and now his younger brother is with him, and we are beginning the beginning work to sta!
  rt a democratic school here in Charlotte. (Saving to get the kit from SVS)

  Best of luck -

  Caren
  in Charlotte, NC

  -----Original Message-----
  From: susan robinson <shantiom1_at_msn.com<mailto:shantiom1_at_msn.com>>
  Sent: Nov 28, 2004 12:01 PM
  To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org<mailto:discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
  Subject: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Where to begin?

  I am reading Free at Last, which I obtained from Abraham-Hicks Publications. Our daughter is 8 and attends a local Montessori in Palm Harbor, Florida. Our sweet 8 year old is struggling with math, and I am struggling with trying to coerce her into learning it. It's a no win deal. We have her enrolled in Kumon math tutoring, which she attempts to avoid and postpone on a daily basis. Her teacher at Montessori told me that she has a "peculiar learning style". I tried to explain that she loves the freedom to choose, that her "failure to perform" certain class assignments are due to a lack of interest rather than a lack of intelligence. Our daughter sparkles. She loves people and loves art, but loves people best of all. I consider it a rare gift, and I can see how the use of coercion, even in the forms of rewards and incentives, dims her. I'm looking for a frame of reference that builds a foundation for integrating freedom into living in the "real world" of responsibili!
  ties. I'd like to receive suggestions. We're not quite ready to move to Massachusetts for our daughter to enroll in SVS (although it is certainly an option to be considered). I also need to understand more about how democracy can work; I've often found myself in the minority opinion and outvoted in many so-called democracies.

  --__--__--

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Received on Mon Nov 29 2004 - 13:19:06 EST

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