Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] stories about graduates

From: Ann Ide <ann.ide_at_rcn.com>
Date: Mon Jul 26 12:00:00 2004

This is good. How about some more recent examples, too ? Legacy of Trust
is pretty old already.

And, Carol, what is your son doing professionally now ? In how many, and
what ways would he be considered "successful" ?

Ann
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Rovner" <rovners_at_netvision.net.il>
To: <discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
Sent: Monday, July 26, 2004 11:44 AM
Subject: [Discuss-sudbury-model] stories about graduates

>
> You can also read stories about graduates in, Legacy of Trust -- Life
After
> the Sudbury Valley Experience http://www.sudval.org/presspics/legacy.jpg
> What becomes of students who attended Sudbury Valley as they pursue their
> lives as adults? Here is a comprehensive study of the personal and
> professional histories of 188 former students, along with extensive
comments
> on how they feel the school influenced their lives. Also included are the
> results of three earlier studies.
> http://www.sudval.org/books.html
>
> What former students have to say
> SVS 25th Anniversary Retrospective: Five Former Students, Where They Are
and
> How They Got There A lively panel presentation, including a question and
> answer session with the audience. The alumni range in ages from 22-36, and
> include a physician, a graphic designer, a mathematics professor, a
> musician, and a dramatist (audio track of video tape by the same name).
> An Evening with Three Alumni Former students reminisce about their life at
> Sudbury Valley School, and what they have been doing since they left; with
> questions from the audience (audio track of video tape by the same name).
>
> ~ David
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Carol Hughes" <hughes0005_at_comcast.net>
> To: <discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
> Sent: Monday, July 26, 2004 4:19 PM
> Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Philosophy (was Paradigms)
>
>
> > What a great idea. Let's hear stories about graduates out there. I'll
> > start. My son, on several occasions thought that a professor's grade
was
> > wrong on an exam, walked into the office and explained why and got his
> grade
> > changed. He also determined that he concentrated much better on his
> courses
> > when he didn't take notes. Did he graduate? Were the first tests he
ever
> > had in college? Yes and yes. Did he takes SAT's? No. Didn't need to.
> I
> > think it is impossible to teach responsility in an artificial setting.
If
> > the results of a decision are not real, then the investment in the
process
> > isn't real either. Did he hang in there when 90% of the student body
left
> > due to an unfair withdrawel of accreditation? Yes. Someone asked me if
I
> > was proud of him for getting a college degree. My response was, no, I'm
> > proud of him for following his dream. Well, I don't want to hog all the
> air
> > space in here. Would love to hear from others.
> > Carol
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Ann Ide" <ann.ide_at_rcn.com>
> > To: <discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
> > Sent: Monday, July 26, 2004 10:01 AM
> > Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Philosophy (was Paradigms)
> >
> >
> > > That's the conventional paradigm, all right. So, how can we address
> those
> > > concerns without challenging them in such a way that it only brings
out
> > > defenses ? What examples and information do we know to counterpoint ?
> Do
> > > we have "successful" graduates ? It would be really helpful to be
able
> to
> > > share those stories. Do we have different statistics ? The more
> informed
> > > we are the better we'll be able to educate others effectively.; don't
> you
> > > think?
> > >
> > > Who do people think are responsible for development of social skills,
> > > critical thinking skills, communication skills, creativity, self
> > motivation
> > > and responsibility, ability to work independently and with
teams......?
> > > It takes more than academics and good character to succeed in the
world.
> > > How about we get people thinking about the importance of these traits
> and
> > > how it is lacking in public schools and nurtured in Sudbury models ?
> > > Actually, I recall our old public school even having curriculum for
> > > character develpment and some of the skills I mentioned. But they
would
> > > "teach" them so artificially ! They had kids sitting around in a
circle
> > > being asked questions or put through exercises totally bored. You
can't
> > > schedule training for these things into a 1/2 hour slot once a week !
> > >
> > > It's so interesting to watch the difference between my sons' play with
> SVS
> > > vs. public school friends. With their public school friends, I see
they
> > > have one or two things they have in common that they like to do
> together.
> > > When they tire of that, they start with the "What do you want to do? "
> "
> > I
> > > don't know. What do you want to do?" And it falls apart. I never
see
> > > that with their SVS friends. There is always a beautiful flow of
> > > conversation and/or activity. They could just go on forever; as they
> > often
> > > do with ongoing "sleepovers". Have others seen this ? Oh, and another
> > thing
> > > that really bugs me ! In our area, public school kids schedule
> > "playdates"
> > > and they only have one friend over at a time so it will "work" ! AH
> > > !!!!!!!!! If Jesse calls his friend and s/he already has a friend
> over,
> > > s/he actually says he can't come over. How pathetic. With SVS
friends,
> > the
> > > more the merrier. I can just see these kids as adults in the
> workplace,
> > > waiting to be told what to do ( and hoping it's not much ); or in a
> > meeting,
> > > going "What should we do? " " I don't know. What do you think?" And
> > will
> > > they be allowed to only work with one person at at time ??? Someone
> > should
> > > make a movie showing the crossover from public school behaviors and
> > > activities into the typical, inefffective workplace.
> > >
> > > Ann
> > >
> > > ( How's that, Carol ? I used a story ! :) )
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > > From: "Sally Rosloff" <sallyr_at_socal.rr.com>
> > > To: <discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org>
> > > Sent: Sunday, July 25, 2004 4:20 PM
> > > Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Philosophy (was Paradigms)
> > >
> > >
> > > > Carol wrote:
> > > > "When did college become the one and only indicator of a successful
> > > > education? It is as though schools exist to feed consumers into
other
> > > > schools, and how many of the graduates become part of this system of
> > > > creating more and more students? People almost never ask what kind
of
> > > human
> > > > being your child is. Just, what grade are they in, and where did
they
> > go
> > > to
> > > > college. How silly this is. In your last 25 or 30 exchanges with
> > adults,
> > > > how many of them talked about college or what their degree is in?
> When
> > do
> > > > we get to the real stuff? How confident, competent, compassionate
and
> > > > productive are you? That's what I want to know. "
> > > >
> > > > "What are Schools For? Holistic Education in American Culture" is a
> > great
> > > > book by Ron Miller that traces the history of education in this
> > > > country. It provides great information and context for how we've
> gotten
> > > to
> > > > where we are today, including the emphasis on a college education
and
> on
> > > > education as memorizing and feeding back and doing what you're told.
> > > >
> > > > Some answers out there that I've noticed to your questions above:
> > > >
> > > > College means the best chance at a good job and material success and
> > > > therefore happiness, and parents want to see their kids happy.
> Parents
> > > > hear statistics all the time on the more education (meaning the more
> > > > degrees), the more money you make.
> > > >
> > > > The parents job is to raise their children to be responsible adults,
> > which
> > > > is accomplished by making sure they follow all the rules of the
> > > traditional
> > > > system.
> > > >
> > > > The school's job is to teach academics, leave character development
> > > > (compassion, cooperation, kindness, thoughtfulness, confidence,
etc.)
> to
> > > > me, the parent.
> > > >
> > > > To be successful (earn a good living) you need skills and training
> which
> > > > you get through being taught in school and college.
> > > >
> > > > People do not ask what kind of human being your child is because
that
> is
> > > > seen as outside the job of schools, that is something developed in
the
> > > home
> > > > and church and community, etc. and at school only as a byproduct of
> > > > extracurricular activities if at all. Different groups have
different
> > > > ideas about how human beings should be but may agree on what
teaching
> > > > academics is.
> > > >
> > > > All of the above are in line with the discussion on paradigms
because
> > > these
> > > > answers arise from one paradigm while our answers arise from
another.
> > > That
> > > > is why Ron Miller talks about need for transformation rather than
> > reform.
> > > >
> > > > Sally
>
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Received on Mon Jul 26 2004 - 11:59:39 EDT

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