RE: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Introduction, Technology at Sudbury

From: Joe Jackson <shoeless_at_jazztbone.com>
Date: Mon Nov 25 09:30:00 2002

Hi Jason,

> Is there any attempt made to curb
> illegal copying and software piracy?

For relatively tiny schools like us, we go to extraordinary lengths to
try and ensure that we own liscenses for all software on our computers.

> More generally, how
> does the school community deal with illegal or questionable
> online activities like trading music, viewing pornography,
> etc.?

For us (Fairhaven School in Maryland), viewing pornography is dealt with
in the law book as a prohibited sexually explicit activity.

Trading music? That's pretty far in the weeds. Students don't have
email accounts at the school and we don't have a CD burner, so I would
say that if a student is downloading an MP3 and listening to it at
school or bringing a ripped CD to school and playing it on a stereo it's
next to impossible to patrol and impractical to enforce.

Just like the real world. ;)

> Imagine if a student used a school computer to run a
> server for MP3's, facilitating illegal music copying.

I couldn't see a computer corporation in one of our schools doing
something like that. Something like that would be much more obvious as
a "write-upabble" activity than furtive teenage listening sessions of
ripped Rage Against the Machine CDs. And plus that use would obviously
have to be sponsored by the computer corporation. I just don't see it.

In any case, we have precious few resources enough maintaining a dinky
peer-to-peer network of tired and huddled donated desktop boxes and one
shared satellite internet connection. I think running an MP3 server is
beyond what we could pull off.

> Do you think the
> school community would pass that responsibility to the
> individual(s) responsible, or would they create a school rule
> against illegal activity?

I think all the schools have rules against illegal activities.

The reason for the rule is not to pass off some liability to students,
but that is a net effect of it.

But really, even if a school were responsible for illicit copies of
software or music or other intellectual property, the remedy is civil,
not criminal. Our little schools would represent way too small a crumb
for even a destitute recording company or software company to want to
snack on. Not to say we don't make an effort; just that we're not
really concerned about the violations that slip through the cracks.

Joe Jackson

> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-sudbury-model-admin_at_sudval.org
> [mailto:discuss-sudbury-model-admin_at_sudval.org] On Behalf Of Jason Jay
> Sent: Sunday, November 24, 2002 10:22 PM
> To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org
> Subject: RE: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Introduction, Technology
> at Sudbury
>
>
> What a great story, Evelyn. Thanks for responding. It's
> inspiring to hear that the students were able to marshall the
> resources for new machines on their own.
>
> One thing that caught my attention is that students bring
> software from home. Is there any attempt made to curb
> illegal copying and software piracy? More generally, how
> does the school community deal with illegal or questionable
> online activities like trading music, viewing pornography,
> etc.? Imagine if a student used a school computer to run a
> server for MP3's, facilitating illegal music copying. If the
> machine were traced by record companies and law enforcement,
> the school might be held responsible. Do you think the
> school community would pass that responsibility to the
> individual(s) responsible, or would they create a school rule
> against illegal activity?
>
> -Jason
>
> ______________________________________________________
> "Fighting with another makes war, but
> struggling with one's self brings peace."
> -Hazrat Inayat Khan
>
> http://www.jasonjay.com
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-sudbury-model-admin_at_sudval.org
> [mailto:discuss-sudbury-model-admin_at_sudval.org] On Behalf Of
> Evfocus_at_aol.com
> Sent: Sunday, November 24, 2002 9:56 PM
> To: discuss-sudbury-model_at_sudval.org
> Subject: Re: [Discuss-sudbury-model] Introduction, Technology
> at Sudbury
>
> Hi Jason,
> For a long time there were only two computers and there was
> competition for
> computer time so one student who wanted to have more computer
> time. He
> contacted all the parents and some companies and got four
> computers donated
> to the school. He formed a computer corporation with other
> students and they
> in charge of maintenence. Students bring thier own software.
> There are only two students who bring laptops. My daughter is
> one of them but
> she only brings it on occasion. I have never heard a
> students cell phone
> ring at our school. Which either means they don't have them
> or they don't
> feel the need to use them very much.
> I know that there has been a big push to get computers in the
> public schools.
> I have a ten year old and a six year old that have never
> taken a computer
> class.My ten year old had this banner of words scrolling on
> thier own across
> and email she was sending to a friend. This isn't something I
> know how to do.
> I asked her about it. She says "It's HTML code mom."
> One of her pen pals taught her.Computers like everthing else
> are easily
> mastered when your interested.
> I am very happy I found this school for my daughters.
> My Best,
> Evelyn
> Diablo Valley Parent
>
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Received on Mon Nov 25 2002 - 09:29:43 EST

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