Re[4]: DSM: The Value of the Sudbury Model

From: David Rovner (rovners@netvision.net.il)
Date: Tue Apr 17 2001 - 12:08:59 EDT


Alan Klein wrote:
>3. Why is education a parents' responsibility in your mind? Why not the
>individual child's responsibility?

I think parents responsibility is a "meta"-responsibility -- a higher, more
comprehensive-responsibility.
The parents' primary, and not only, responsibility -- in general and
in education in particular -- is PROVIDING children with real life
experiences, and LETTING children make choices between alternative
courses of action and exercise judgment: This is still the parents'
responsibility. Then the responsibility goes over to the child
-- as is extensively described in Sudbury Valley School's writings.
I can think as parents' responsibility, for instance, bringing their young
children to school.
I find it difficult to see a child age four deciding for the first time what school
to attend -- presenting alternatives is also the parents' responsibility at this stage.

Parents have a "meta"-role in their children's affairs. The rest is done by the child.

Putting the responsibility of education on parents instead of on the
government, GIVES PARENTS BACK their lost responsibility for their children:
"There Is No Taxation Without Representation" -- parents pay the tuition.

>1. If it were possible for all parents to afford education for their kids,
>then I would agree with you. Unfortunately, this is not the case and leaving
>it entirely up to parents' own initiative means dooming many kids.

Until change comes, you decide today according to your children's interest
and your own. Still, you can support the changing of laws or lobbying for
change or endorsing change -- you take responsibility for your life,
for instance: endorsing the "Alliance for the Separation of School and State"
-- "Ending Involvement of Government in Education" www.sepschool.org

If we want changes, we must work for them -- they won't come for themselves.
(see three quotations at the bottom) (*)

>2. My main point is, as long as taxes ARE used to pay for education, then
>parents/kids should be in charge of what education they pay for and should
>be able to choose what type of schooling/unschooling they desire.

I agree with you, as long as taxes ARE used to pay for education,
parents/kids should be in charge of what education they pay
for and should be able to choose what type of schooling/unschooling
they desire, but it is well know: politicians, teachers in general, and other
sectors, refuse to loosen the bridle they hold over citizens -- so they
wouldn't yield the power/control they were granted. "Authority in and of
itself can be good or bad, depending on many things", [Introduction. Free
at Last, The Sudbury Valley School, Daniel Greenberg, p. 5]
 
Still, for "utopias"(*) we have to work -- they don't come for themselves

----------------------------------
(*)
"Before the school actually started in 1968, many people said that
we were dreamers, that our vision of school was utopian. But now it has
existed for years, for everyone to see."

[excerpt, Introduction. Free at Last, The Sudbury
 Valley School, Daniel Greenberg, p. 7]

                                           * * *
      "Three hundred years ago, if somebody would have ventured
the opinion that it is possible to create a country in which people
from all walks of life, all persuasions, nationalities, and
backgrounds, could live together in freedom, peace, and harmony,
could live happy lives, could realize their personal dreams -- a
country in which people showed each other mutual respect, in
which people treated each other with complete equality, and in
which people all the decisions were made by mutual consent of
the governed, people would have considered that person a crazy
utopian and would have brought all the experience of human
history from the dawn of times as witness to the impossibility of
such a dream. They would have said, "People just don't live that
way, It doesn't work. It can't happen."
     Happily for us here today, two centuries ago our founding
fathers did not treat that dream as utopian and instead found a
way to make it possible to put it into practice. They did
something unique in the history of the human race . . ."

                                              *
     "Sudbury Valley School is a true democratic republic of children
and adults working together. Does it sound utopian? It may, but no less
utopian the United States of America sounded when people first heard
about it in the rest of the world. Our school, we feel, is indeed a utopia
that is as real as the country of which it is part."

[two excerpts from, POSTSCRIPT -- The View from Sudbury Valley.
 Education in America, A View from Sudbury Valley,
 Daniel Greenberg, p. 219 and 230]

David Rovner, Haifa, Israel rovners@netvision.net.il

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I recommend that the Statue of Liberty on the East Coast be
supplemented by a Statue of Responsibility on the West Coast.

Viktor E. Frankel, MAN'S SEARCH FOR MEANING
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------- Original Message ----------

>From: "Alan Klein" <Alan@klein.net>
>To: <discuss-sudbury-model@aramis.sudval.org>
>Date: Tue, 17 Apr 2001 06:55:22 -0400
>Subject: Re: Re[2]: DSM: The Value of the Sudbury Model

>David Rovner said,

>"(E)ducation is NOT a community responsibility, and should NOT be paid for
>through taxes. Education is a PARENTS RESPONSIBILITY, and should be paid for
>by parents..."

>David,

>A few musings:

>1. If it were possible for all parents to afford education for their kids,
>then I would agree with you. Unfortunately, this is not the case and leaving
>it entirely up to parents' own initiative means dooming many kids.

>2. My main point is, as long as taxes ARE used to pay for education, then
>parents/kids should be in charge of what education they pay for and should
>be able to choose what type of schooling/unschooling they desire.

>3. Why is education a parents' responsibility in your mind? Why not the
>individual child's responsibility?

>~Alan
_____________________________________________
First they ignore you, then they laugh at you,
then they fight you, then you win.

Mahatma Gandhi
_____________________________________________
   



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