Re: DSM: New to homeschooling and SVS


Scott Gray (sgray@aramis.sudval.org)
Tue, 3 Apr 2001 23:43:38 -0400 (EDT)


On Tue, 3 Apr 2001 GREGUSLUC@aol.com wrote:

> The Waldorf Educational movement could be another resource. It is like the
> Sudbury Model only with more structure. Both believe in engaging a child's
> will and never suppressing it. Academics (READING) are not taught until 3rd
> grade. No text books are used children make there own lesson books.
> Emphasis is on music, art, drama handwork (making clothes, dolls, straw
> houses , . Two languages are taught orally from grade one .
> In grade one the kids make there own knitting needles from whittling wood.
> Knitting is considered an important skill, which later aid reading and math
> ability. The children have the same teacher for the first 8 years.

Your statement bewilders me. In what way is the sort of school you
describe similar to a Sudbury model school? Waldorf schools are certainly
places with _different_ curricula than traditional schools do. But
Waldorf schools certainly do _have_ curriculum, which are enforced just as
dilligently as the curriculum in a traditional school.

The Sudbury model seems to me to be every bit as distant from Waldorf
model as it is from the traditional model. I see only confirmation of
this in the evidence that you present.

I would strongly suggest advise you to read the article at
http://www.fairhavenschool.com/articlesmain2.htm
 
--Scott David Gray
reply to: sgray@sudval.org
http://www.unseelie.org/
============================================================
If you're poor now, my friend, then you'll stay poor. These
days only the rich get given more.

-- Martial's Epigrams, Book 5, 81. Translation: James
Michie, 1972.
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