RE: RE: DSM: Dismal according to their own measure...


Joseph Moore (joseph@ivorycc.com)
Fri, 1 Oct 1999 14:50:27 -0700


Nope. Not consigning anyone to languish. Merely pointing out that the
LEARNING part of the question isn't that big a deal.

What you've brought up are all sorts of social issues that affect how people
learn. Is it really true that school is the only or best place to address
these issues? Or is it rather a case of instutitional schooling being a
hammer, so that everything looks like a nail?

I think the first step in addressing social problems is to stop thinking the
school are going to solve them. There are problems schooling won't solve.
Even democratic schools.

But democratic schools are a great place to start.
> ----------
> From: sharons@juliet.ll.mit.edu[SMTP:sharons@juliet.ll.mit.edu]
> Reply To: discuss-sudbury-model@sudval.org
> Sent: Friday, October 01, 1999 10:15 AM
> To: discuss-sudbury-model@sudval.org
> Subject: RE: RE: DSM: Dismal according to their own measure...
>
>
> The failure of schools to teach all students to write up to
> a standard measure is, indeed, sad. However, let's not forget
> who these schools are teaching - the public schools must include
> the learning disabled, the poor, and the immigrants, all of whom
> have much to overcome in achieving even basic skills.
> Yes - if you have no relevant learning disabilities, and the
> people who care about you read, you'll probably learn to read
> fairly readily. But this is not everyone, by any means. Are
> you suggesting that those who cannot learn to read with only
> minimal effort merely be left to languish? What about those
> who are eager to read but have no books and no local library?
>
>
>
>



This archive was generated by hypermail 2.0b3 on Thu Dec 23 1999 - 09:01:59 EST