Re: DSM: religious school = more military like?


Joe Jackson (shoeless@erols.com)
Sun, 8 Aug 1999 10:37:28 -0400


-----Original Message-----
From: jillwolfe <jillwolfe@mindspring.com>
To: discuss-sudbury-model@sudval.org <discuss-sudbury-model@sudval.org>
Date: Thursday, July 29, 1999 2:12 PM
Subject: Re: DSM: religious school = more military like?

>
>For the least control, homeschool your kids and never register them with
any
>state!

Can't.

Truancy laws.

Besides, homeschooled kids have always struck me as a little automaton-like.
Perhaps the environment's a little too homogenous. (Now that's interesting,
the root of the word _homogenous_ is homo, which I guess means home. So
perhaps it's a truism to say that homeschooling is homogenous).

- Joe Jackson, shoeless@erols.com
*****
Visit Fairhaven School's website at
www.fairhavenschool.com

>
>
>At 05:40 PM 7/19/99 -0400, you wrote:
>>At 05:17 PM 7/15/99 -0400, you wrote:
>>
>>>Can anyone speak to the question of how much control various states
>>>have over private schools? Doubtless it varies greatly. Here in
>>>Massachussetts, I believe there is relatively little control, if any.
>>>(With the exception of schools for 'special needs' children which must
>>>meet some standards in regards to funding concerns.)
>>>
>>>
>>>Sharon
>>>
>>
>>In Connecticut, back when I was in Catholic school (this is a disclaimer
>>meaning I have no idea what the current situation is), we had to meet the
>>same basic criteria for a diploma as the public schools - i.e. 4 years of
>>English, 4 years of phys. ed., and whatever else was on the list, but I
>>don't remember anyone ever checking or questioning the content of the
>>courses, and the state did not require us to submit to any standardized
>>testing (although the school sure did!).
>>
>>I think part of it was, at least at that time, that private schools,
>>particularly Catholic schools, were viewed as being much more stringent
>>academically than the public schools - probably a fair assessment - and so
>>did not require the oversight that the public schools did. Also, the
>>private schools did not suffer as much from lack of financial resources or
>>parental involvement - both seen as critical to successful schooling.
>>
>>T.
>>
>>
>
>



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