Re: Gender Equality

Dale R. Reed (dale-reed@postoffice.worldnet.att.net)
Tue, 28 Oct 1997 20:38:11 -0800

KleinCon@aol.com wrote:
>
> In a message dated 97-10-28 12:23:14 EST, Dale wrote:
>
> << There are not that many heroes and heroines(unequals) for
> students to admire >>
>
> Dale,
>
> I am unclear what "unequals" means in this sentence.

Alan I was trying to stay on thread but use words that I prefer. I
don't think anyone is equal to anyone else. We are CREATED equal
according to the Declaration of Independence but I figure from then on
all bets are off.

One reason I do not like most schools is they encourage the students to
succumb to peer pressure. Of course Japan's school system is infamous
for doing this resulting in a high suicide rate. But many school
children all over the world commit at least intellectual suicide because
of the pressures on the fastest and brightest to slow down and the
slower ones to speed up. In their attempts to be equal.

To put it another way.

When a movie is being made there are a few stars and there are the many
extras. Movie directors attempt to make their stars(heroes and heroines
and villains, their relatively high salaries signifying that they are
not equals) appear even more special by playing down the individuality
of the persons making up the "supporting cast of thousands." Making the
individual members of the crowds all equal.

But in the real world you never can tell as you look out over a crowd or
walk through your neighborhood how each individual you see or meet has
in the past or will in the future distinguish themselves. Each person
on this earth has a story to tell. Granted some of the stories are more
interesting than others. But we very definitely are not equal to each
other. None of us. And I think we should respect each other for our
differences rather than treat each other as equals.

Ayn Rand said it was very important that youngsters read romantic novels
in order to better determine who they will model our lives after.
Sounds good to me. At least until richer learning environments come
along.

And I do not mean to imply that I expect that anyone on this list
disagrees with anything I said above. All I am trying to do is tell you
that I for one have a chip on my shoulder that is easily knocked off
when I hear the words "demo.."(I promised a few months ago not to use
that word on this list anymore) and "equality" and there are a few
others I will tell you about if you use them. Dale

-- 
$  dale-reed@worldnet.att.net   Seattle, Washington U.S.A.  $