from [SwiftRain <swifty@nospam.elision.com>] (fwd)

Scott D Gray (sdg@world.std.com)
Thu, 30 Jan 1997 09:19:27 -0500 (EST)

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Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 01:03:43 -0500 (EST)
From: discuss-sudbury-model-approval@world.std.com
To: discuss-sudbury-model-approval@world.std.com
Subject: BOUNCE discuss-sudbury-model@world.std.com: Non-member submission from [SwiftRain <swifty@nospam.elision.com>]

To: discuss-sudbury-model@facteur.std.com
Subject: Re: Three Threads in a Fountain
References: <v01540b02af15c3e58644@[128.135.18.101]>
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Bruce L. Smith wrote:
>
[snip]
> I believe that traditional education is "appropriate" for nothing but
> socialization/indoctrination and training. That's certainly all I saw
> in my five years as a public educator. The few students who readily
> adapt to the system, the overly tractable...those I worry about.
[snip]

alright, i agree with you.

or at least... i would like to agree with you. it certainly seems that
way to me. but on the other hand, we have quite a few million otherwise
rational people who insist that there is value in traditional education.

it is easy to dismiss an idea as irrational, unfounded or dogmatic when
only a small number of people believe it -- but what evidence or logic
can we offer to people that will overcome the weight of the opinion of
such a vast majority?

what can be the explanation for a world in which only a tiny percentage
of the people support the most valid opinion?

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SwiftRain <swifty@elision.com> -- http://www.elision.com/sr/