FW: Separation of School & State on C-SPAN

jlilly (jlilly@i-55.com)
Wed, 13 Nov 1996 00:16:43 -0600

To whom is interested,

I would like to open a discussion of using the S.V.S. philosophy with
homeschooling. I know that there are no simple answers. I feel I
understand the basis of the philosophy but there are issues that I need
input from others more well versed in this model.

These are some of the arguements or topics of discussions from people
not too familiar with S.V.S. model.

Q. Can one person be all things to each student? (In my case, 4)

Possible responses:
1)You need not be. Children interested in learning need a tool,
not you.
2)Find mentors.

Q. Once again, the question of interaction with other children.
Homeschool children are mostly with their siblings. This is not
to say that they are isolated from other children. At S.V.S.
(and models) children are with other children (of all ages).
How can you do that when you homeschool?

Open for discussion.

Q. I've been asked, "How many homes are democraticly run?" I've
beentold, "You can't do both (democratic school and home,
democratic or not) in the same setting."

Opinions welcomed.

Q. After getting across to others the idea of allowing them to learn
what they are interested in, I still get asked, "What about
the state?"

My questions:

From what I understand, the real essence of this model is to allow
children to be responsible for themselves, their learning, their actions.
By allowing children this freedom they discover a crucial sense lacking in
the typical school setting; the sense of self. Do you find that by allowing
this discovery to evolve, there is less adolescent "rebelion"?

It's been stated that there is no dyslexia or attention defecit at
S.V.S. As to A.D.D., why do you think it has become so widespread?

My short opinion: it is unwhittingly taught by the unrelatedness of
subjects and time allotments for class, let alone the disinterest of the
learners.

Are there some children that are just not interested .... or is it that
what they are interested in has yet to be discovered by them...or does this
relate to the sense of self ..... could their lack of ability to focus be
biochemical .... do you think this is a social/culturally created phenomenon?

Most of these children labeled A.D.D. can focus and maintain attention
given that they are interested. Why is this so overlooked?


Anticipating
feedback,

Judith
jlilly@i-55.com